Our Brewery
We make Beer. One step at a time.

Discover the process

1

Starting from scratch

Every week, around 25 tonnes of malt are delivered. The grain is stored in four 12-metre-high grain silos.

2

Day silo

The malt is carefully transferred to the day silo. First, it is cleaned and the malt dust is removed. It may be called the day silo, but the “Old Lady” is hard at work at night too. We run the brewery 24 hours a day to brew our six Valaisanne beers.

3

Wet mill

The malt is fed into the original 1967 wet mill, where it is mixed with Valais brewing water heated to 65°C. This process is known as mashing the malt.

4

Mashing

The mash is not brought up to temperature in the mash tun; instead it is heated in batches in a separate mash kettle. This stage of production is instrumental in giving the beer its flavour.

5

Lautering

After mashing, the solid and liquid parts of the mash are separated. The clear liquid is known as wort, and this is what is used to make the beer. The remaining part of the mash is the spent grain.

6

Boiling in the brewhouse

The next step takes place in our amazing “brewery kitchen” with its imposing brewing copper. The wort is boiled inside the copper, and the hops are added at this stage.

7

Whirlpool kettle

Next, the wort, which contains a lot of sugar, goes into the whirlpool kettle for its “spa” treatment, where it is left to rest, steam off and cool down.

8

Fermenting and storage cellar

Before the cooled brew goes into the fermentation tanks, the yeast is added. This converts the sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide, and creates the beer’s lovely taste and delicious aroma. This “green” beer is kept in the fermentation tanks for one week, after which it is matured for a further three weeks in horizontal storage tanks. After every use, the tanks are cleaned by hand, which takes about an hour’s work in the cold storage cellar for each tank.

9

Filtration

Last but not least, the mature beer is passed through a modern filter system. Filtering removes clouding particles and yeast and hop residues to clarify the beer. Of course, our Bière de Cave, Pale Ale and Ämrich wheat beer do not go through this stage!

10

Kegging

Once filtering is complete, the final stage is to keg the beer in 20-, 30- and 50-litre kegs. Our automatic kegging system can fill up to 80 kegs an hour. Every single production stage, from adding the dry malt to ready-to-keg beer, is cherished with loving care and our passion for the fine art of brewing beer.